WRITE WILD TO STOP THE MANITOBA “PEAT RUSH”

As a follow up to yesterday’s post this is the other information available at the Wilderness Committee letter writing page:

“WRITE WILD TO STOP THE MANITOBA “PEAT RUSH”

Manitoba is suffering from a “peat rush” right now, with companies currently trying to get approval to strip mine thousands of hectares of boreal lowlands to harvest peat moss. Peatlands, however, are an important part of a healthy Manitoba environment.

Peatlands, which are all wetlands, are natural filters that provide and store clean, clear fresh water. Peat lowlands also provide important habitat for unique plant species like the carnivorous pitcher plant (right), as well as moose. But the most significant benefit of peatlands is that they store vast amounts of carbon, which helps mitigate the impacts of climate change.

Mining peat will reduce or eliminate all of these ecological benefits.

Please write to the Minister for Conservation and Water Stewardship, and let him know your opinion on this important public land issue.

Your Name: *
Your Email Address: *

Some points to consider:

  • Lake Winnipeg is the most endangered great lake in Canada, struggling with disconcerting water quality issues. Peat bogs are a natural water filtration solution that improves the health of the lake. The recently enacted “Save Lake Winnipeg Act” banned further peat quarry permits. We should not allow these projects—located only a few hundred metres from the shores of Lake Winnipeg—to proceed.
  • Undisturbed boreal peat bogs store a vast amount of carbon, and the preservation of boreal peatlands is recognized as a globally important mechanism to mitigate climate change. It is not in the public interest to remove this essential planet protection tool.
  • Peatlands take centuries to form, and as such, are not considered a renewable resource. It is currently not possible to restore peat bogs to their original state after mining ends. Allowing these mines will permanently alter the ecology of the area.
  • The lowland areas where peatbogs are found are important habitat for many rare and unique species, and are especially important for moose. Moose populations are declining and suffering due to a variety of causes, so additional moose habitat should not be disturbed.
  • Peat is mined for horticultural and garden use. In a vast majority of applications, peat can be substituted with another soil additive instead. Peat is not an essential product, like most metals that are mined.
  • The peat industry only employs a small number of people in Manitoba, with very modest royalties and taxes collected for the peat by the Manitoba government. The long-term damage to our environment will be more costly than the short-term economic gain.
  • To ensure your letter gets official recognition, please include the following reference numbers for all of the new peat mines:Sunterra’s proposal #4254.1

    Sun Gro’s proposal #5548 

    Sun Gro’s already issued license #2964

    Berger’s already issued license #2969

    Jiffy Canada’s already issued license #2941″

 The following is a copy of my letter which I sent through the Wilderness Committee:

With reference to :
Sunterra’s proposal #4254.1

Sun Gro’s proposal #5548

Sun Gro’s already issued license #2964

Berger’s already issued license #2969

Jiffy Canada’s already issued license #2941

The development of Peat Mines will have a huge devastating effect on the entire ecosystem in and around the Lake Winnipeg area. This must not be allowed to go forward. Please consider the following prior to making your decision:

Lake Winnipeg is the most endangered great lake in Canada, struggling with disconcerting water quality issues. Peat bogs are a natural water filtration solution that improves the health of the lake. The recently enacted “Save Lake Winnipeg Act” banned further peat quarry permits. We should not allow these projects—located only a few hundred metres from the shores of Lake Winnipeg—to proceed.
Undisturbed boreal peat bogs store a vast amount of carbon, and the preservation of boreal peatlands is recognized as a globally important mechanism to mitigate climate change. It is not in the public interest to remove this essential planet protection tool.
Peatlands take centuries to form, and as such, are not considered a renewable resource. It is currently not possible to restore peat bogs to their original state after mining ends. Allowing these mines will permanently alter the ecology of the area.
The lowland areas where peatbogs are found are important habitat for many rare and unique species, and are especially important for moose. Moose populations are declining and suffering due to a variety of causes, so additional moose habitat should not be disturbed.
Peat is mined for horticultural and garden use. In a vast majority of applications, peat can be substituted with another soil additive instead. Peat is not an essential product, like most metals that are mined.
The peat industry only employs a small number of people in Manitoba, with very modest royalties and taxes collected for the peat by the Manitoba government. The long-term damage to our environment will be more costly than the short-term economic gain.

Today’s “stone” is Day 203  write wild to keep it wild

 

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